[Metal/Symphonic] Whyzdom – Armaggedon (Official Video)

Whyzdom, in my opinion the best French symphonic metal band as of today, is slowly but surely bringing their fourth album “As Times Turns To Dust” is teasing us with their first title named “Armageddon”. The album is expected to hit record stores on April 6th.


[Metal/Symphonic] Therion – Beloved Antichrist (90%)

If you have been in the metal scene, the name of Therion should sound familiar to you. Therion is a kind of unique metal band, always in the avant-garde and always in a constant rethinking of their artistic direction, following their inspiration. They compose and perform albums that follow their interest without worrying to irate their hardcore fanbase. With Therion, each album is a discovery by its own unable to predict from the previous albums. And most of the time, they deliver an outstanding piece of work.
And again Therion strikes hard with their album “Beloved Antichrist”. A 3-CD album totaling over 3 hours and playing like an opera metal with an amazing vocal performance. This is an album I cannot review as I would because of its size (46 tracks and 3 hours) but also because of its almost perfection. You could have this album put into an opera performance and people would give you a hard time that this is a metal band behind this masterpiece. I will point my favorite tracks.
“Through Dust, Through Rain” (Track 3), “What Is Wrong?” (Track 16), “Forgive Me” (Track 35) oh my! Who’s the lead female vocalists behind these tracks? It is so beautiful.
“Never Again” (Track 5), “Night Reborn” (Track 20), “Curse of The Fallen” (Track 28), “Astral Sophia” (Track 31) some of the heavy tracks albums reminding me some of the previous Therion work. This is what Therion is so unique, reminding us their quintessence in blending metal and opera-quality vocals.
“The Solid Black Beyond”, “The Crowing of Splendour” (Track 7 and 8), “Pledging Loyalty” (Track 19), “To Where I Weep” (Track 30), “Rise To War” (Track 40). This is some classical composition, oh this is heaven to ears!
“Anthem” (Track 12), “Theme Of Antichrist” (Track 46), a perfect blending of classical opera with heavy metal melodics.
Without doubt, Therion overachieved themselves by producing the longest album (3CDs lasting over 3 hours), a pure marvel of opera metal with quality opera male and female vocals. Such a perfect musical arrangement you could imagine such album put in motion on a stage performance. Definitely if you have to pick an album for February, this was the one you had to pick!


[Metal/Melodic Death] FT-17 – Verdun! (80%)

If there are two things I like, it is surely listening to metal music and reading/watching about History. In particular about World War I, “la der des ders”, “la Grande Guerre”, “la Guerre des Tranchees”. I dont know why I am fixed on this particular war. Perhaps that field trip in the trenches of the “Col Du Linge” during my Junior High, maybe witnessing the violence of this war as I read through textbook.
Having a chance to combine both metal with WWI thematic is certainly the best idea I ever heard and it was a surprise I discovered the band FT-17 (the name of one of the first assault tank built by the French carmaker Renault) last year through Bandcamp. FT-17 is a French Melodic Death band from Nantes that have a strong inspiration from the same World War (with a piano giving this sound of a mute movie). With their first album “Marcellin S’en Va En Guerre”, we witnessed through the writing of Marcellin Trouve his journey through the first half of the war, from the Declaration of War to the Battle of the Marne.
In this second album, we follow Marcellin through his arrival in Verdun and the onset of the Battle of Verdun that took place from February 1916. The whole album is a 10-track album totaling about 45 minutes. The brutality of the death, the fast-paced drums perfectly match the adrenaline rush that soldiers when they were requested to lead the charge each morning across the no-man’s land, all of that backed by the sound of machine-guns, cannon shellings and explosion that only a visit in Verdun museum will give you an auditory experience of the brutality of this war.
We follow Marcellin’s charge in his diaries through the trenches, witnessing the carnage and the desolation, in which the drenching smell of rotting bodies, of excrements, of the urine, sweat and blood blend with soldiers shellshocked and in a denial state of the barbarity of the scene.
The album is overall fairly good, as good as their first album. But certainly the piece of resistance is the last title “Au Fond Du Trou” (inside the hole).
Starting with a piano solo followed by a dry bass guitar a la Black Sabbath, like a calm dawn before the officer whistling the first assault of the day. You can feel the anxiety and rush before a horde of soldiers forced to drink ramp themselves up to climb over the No-Man’s Land, with the sound of the whistle to lead. Hungry, tired, dirty, sick and completely apathetic, all these young men in their prime time of their life, launched in a useless assault to conquer a couple of yards from the enemy line. All commanded by some anachronic generals sitting far away from the front lines, moving these battalions as pawns on a global chessboard.
Nothing better translate the absurdity as Marcellin summarize the failure of the assault, with the loss of 75% of a battalion in another useless assault. In the average day, thats about 10’000 soldiers sent to the carnage.
Where Sabaton tells the tales of heroic battles, FT-17 makes a point in describing one of the worst modern war, replacing the glory with the mud, blood and the reality of the war. If I was teaching History to the 8th grader, I would certainly combine this album with a Music teacher to show how music can translate the horror of a war that is often overseen in textbook. “L’enfer c’est la boue!”.


[Metal] Happy Holidays! My 15 metal albums and EPs of 2017!

Happy Holidays everyone! As we are now engaged in the last week of 2017, it is a great time for me to go back through my library and pick my 12 albums of 2017. No particular rankings, most of the albums have been reviewed in my blog. I have set the EPs aside since they are not counted as album.

1. January: Xandria – Theater of Dimension

2017 started with a bang with Xandria releasing their latest album and the second album with Dianne Von Giersbergen as front vocals. The motto was “harder, faster, stronger, better”. Damn it was a good album to listen, Dianne being perfect as usual. Unfortunately, the rest of the year was less good for the band. The second leg of the US tour cancelled, Dianne thrown in the residue bin like an used ragdoll. Fortunately, that also means that Dianne is likely reviving Ex-Libris.

2. January: Au Champ Des Morts – Dans La Joie

It is not often that you find French metal bands getting under the spotlight (unless you are Gojira or Alcest), even less French metal bands that sing in French. This was a pure random encounter in my discography, during a Bandcamp campaign (damn Bandcamp is such a great place to discover bands). Mixing elements of black metal and doom, it is a delight to listen to the French lyrics. A must-have in your collection if you are also attracted to the dark side of the Force and needing to find a solace to old wounds.

3. February: FT-17 – Marcellin S’en Va En Guerre

Another Bandcamp pick. Aside from sciences, metal, Sci-Fi and video games, I have another great interest. History! In particular, I am very fixated on World War I: “la Der Des Ders”; “La Grande Guerre”; “La Guerre Des Poilus”. Don’t ask me how my brain clicked on that particular war, maybe because of that field trip during my middle school year at “Le Col Du Linge”, harboring trenches and a museum of this horrible war. The context of military history is not much new and those who know Sabaton know their power-metal hits narrating historical battles. This one is particular. This first album of the melodic death metal band FT-17 (named after one of the first type of French assault tank “Renault FT-17”) is particular as it follow the PFC Marcellin Trouve, writing to his notes his experience of the war, from the joyful draft and heading to the front line to the delusion of the war.

4. March: Midnight Sorrow – Pick A Tale

March was highlighted from the release of the first album by Midnight Sorrow, another French band but this time from my hometown and in the Symphonic Metal genre. I really liked their first EP “At First” and this album took some time to come in, but it was indeed for the better. Coming from their EP, you can hear the maturation of the band in both the musical arrangement (bolder, more confident) and also from Maureen’s voice (in which you can really hear her progress on her vocal abilities). I usually hate when the album is recycling old songs from the previous EP but the band went the extra mile and revisited their songs giving them a second breath with their more experienced sound. It was such a delight to hear that album.

5. May: Seven Kingdoms – Decennium

One thing that I found a bit boring on the US metal scene is the vast domination of the death metal scene and its derived genres (metalcore, deathcore, grindcore…). For some reasons, European favorite genres like Power, Symphonic or Doom are not that popular. So when you have a US metal band playing outside this “terra cognita” it is a welcome. When that same group slap you with a damn awesome album, it is even more welcome.
Hail to Seven Kingdoms, straight out of the Florida panhandle. Florida has a reputation of being the weirdos in the US but they are also home for two awesome US power metal bands: Kamelot and Seven Kingdoms. 72 minutes of a powerful joyride into the meadows of an enchanted land, riding over a robot unicorn, riding in the sunset of a binary star system, slashing an horde of orcs running over using your proton axe to slay the foolish and the foes. If Warhammer 40K should have a soundtrack, I would definitively pick Seven Kingdoms. Just listen to “Stargazer” and tell me you are not all pumped up.

6. May: Alwaid – The Machine & The Beast

Alwaid is another French Metal band that highlighted my album picks in 2017. This second album was quite a departure of their first album “Lacus Somnorium”, that was deeply anchored in atomspheric doom metal. This second is much louder, faster and heavier, more anchored into melodic death but yet with keeping their signature melodics. Again a very good pick and an extensive review of the album on my blog site.

7. June: Neverlight – Nova Red

Neverlight (from Colorado) is this kind of UFOs in my library, standing out by their inability to put them in my classical shelves. Labelled themselves as “dark progressive metal”. It offers a very unique prog metal songs, sharing some similarities with Amaranthe (if you are heavy in the keyboards) but yet very different as it has more darker tones and lyrics. You know what? Enough with the talk. A damn good prog metal album in my library and it pays off to wander into “terra incognito”, just give a try.

8. August: Seven Spires – Solveig

This was another pleasant surprise, as this band straight out of Boston (MA) came out from nowhere and got me hooked up with their title “The Paradox”, directly inspired by Dimmu Borgir and Cradle of Filth. The album per se was very good: engaging melodics, pumping you up with energy and willing you to summon a mosh pit in your cubicle. Playing in different registers, surfing from gothic metal songs like “The Siren/Encounter” to something more mainstream like “The Cabaret of Dreams” to some melodic power metal songs like “Choices” or “Distant Lights”. My favorites remains though “The Paradox” and “Burn”. I leave you with the Paradox official video so can make your choice.

9. September: Paradise Lost – Medusa

Having one of the Unholy Trinity bands release a new album is always welcomed. Paradise Lost “Medusa” is one of these welcome. Adopting a “back to the roots” in terms of the artistic direction of the album, splurging into death doom made this album very special and a hit amongst critiques. It got a very good review on my blog, you can find it.

10. September: Arch Enemy – Will To Power

After 3 years of waiting since “War Eternal”, Michael Amott finally broke the silence and brought on “Will To Power” right to celebrate the 20 years of the band. It was also the second album featuring Alissa White-Gluz. So it was a litmus test for many of the fans and the result was far from disappointing, also a long awaited moment since Jeff Loomis joined the band. It was a hit at first sight with in my opinion a better writing than “War Eternal”. It is brutal (with even some punk influence in the melodics) right from the first track “The Race”, followed by “The World Is Yours” flying into epic melodic power ballads with “The Eagle Flies Alone”. Following the release, the band started the US tour. It was magic! The best concert of 2017.

11. September: Septicflesh – Codex Omega

Septicflesh is a unique band mastering the blending of a classical orchestra with the black symphonic metal style giving you an auditory experience of some of the paintings of Bosch, very finely crafted orchestral arrangement, navigating the different layers of Hell through “Dante’s Inferno”. With Septicflesh, you are welcomed into the Hades Kingdom, navigating through the Styx with Spiro being your guide. A must have if you are attracted by the Dark Side. Considering Spiros and the band are coming nearby for a gig in March, I guess I will add it in the bucket list.

12. September: Clouds – Destin

Whatever I listen, I always come back to doom metal. Behind the darkness and the melancholic tones, I find solace and relief to my mind. There are words I cannot speak, there are feelings I cannot tell, there are wounds that I cannot heal. Doom metal provide me with this opportunity of a catharsis. In sorrow, i found my relief.
This is the case of Clouds “Destin”. Nicely composed, it helps open myself to my mind, let all my sadness, my pain and my sorrow exhale and breath. It allows a deep introspection that few releases can help me cope with these feelings. If you like doom, you MUST try this band.

13. October: Hallatar – No Stars Upon The Bridge

Hallatar is a side project involving various Finnish metal band members including Tomi Joutsen (Amorphis) at the vocals, Juha Raivio (Swallow The Sun) at the guitars and Gas Lipstick (ex-HIM) at the drums. This album is one of the best doom album of the year for different reasons.
Firstly, it is a an album dedicated to the memory of late Aleah Starbridge that left us orphan last year. Secondly, it is an requiem and eulogy album to Aleah, using her poems, giving us a last intimate moment to mourn. The result is simply fantastic and heavy loaded in pain and sorrow. I just hope that this album is closing our mourning on Aleah’s passing and not become an opportunity for anyone to make financial gains on her.

14. November: Evanescence – Synthesis

After a hiatus of over 5 years in terms of album, Amy Lee released “Synthesis” last November. It is per se not a new album, rather it is a an album providing a reorchestration of selected songs spanning through the previous three albums of the band. Some of the songs sound as good as the originals (e.g. “Lithium”), some are even better than original (e.g. “Never Go Back”) and some simply bomb the original (“Bring Me To Life”). It remembers how great Amy is on the vocals and on the piano, and really make us think if Amy decided to “Europeanize” her musical style by taking the best of Symphonic metal.

15. November: Beyond Forgiveness – The Great Wall

“The Great Wall” is the first full-album from the US gothic/symphonic metal band Beyond  Forgiveness (Colorado Springs, CO). I reviewed the album extensively earlier in November so I will comment that much.

The EPs and other albums that were good:
Aside from full-albums listed, there was also the release of “In This Moment We are Free – Cities” by VUUR. With Anneke Von Giersbergen fronting it, it was a great moment to listen in something much heavier than her band “A Gentle Storm”. The album was good, maybe too simple and reminded me a bit the good old times when she was with The Gathering. Maybe a bit too simplistic.
Epica also released an EP “The Solace System” that is a continuation from the “The Holographic Principle”. Again, it was awesome as usual from Epica. You can find more about in one of my previous blog posts.
Another interesting EP I got my hand to was “The Ascension” from Casket Robbery (Madison, WI) formed by Cory Scheider. You may not know Cory but if I am telling you that Cory was part of Luna Mortis, then it will all make sense. Cory put a bit away the melodic death tunes from Luna Mortis and brings in more the brutality into the melodic death. With Megan Orvold bringing the brutal vocals in the line of Angela Gussow (ex-Arch Enemy), you will wish to open a pit of hell inside your living room.

Finally, this year I also got introduced to sludge metal by attending a gig featuring two bands: Rozamov (Boston, MA) and The Ditch & The Delta (Salt Lake City, UT). If you are unfamiliar with sludge metal, it is a blend of doom metal with some Southern death and punk. It has this roughness and Southern flavor that my current doom library is missing. It worth the try. Here two videos are listed from the two bands: Rozamov – “Serpent Cult” and The Ditch & The Delta – “F*ck on Asphalt”


[Punk] Brian Deneke 30/09/1978 – 12/12/1997

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Brian Deneke. His death did not made the international news much, but for those that live in Europe, his death is sharing similarities with the death of Sophie Lancaster (died on 08/11/2007). Many metalheads know about her death, enough to have Delain dedicated a song on her named “We Are The Other” in their album named similarly. Both deaths share the same motivation: murdered because they were different, because they were not fitting the mold of society, because they were ostracized by their attire and their style, because they wanted to live their lives as teenagers using music subgenres as a vehicle for their catharsis. Brian found in the punk culture a liberating moment, Sophie found in the goth culture a liberating moment. Myself found mine in the doom metal culture.
I heard the story of Brian only recently, as a stranger, from my few years living in Yellow City. Some call it Bomb City, because of the nearby Pantex assembly that constitute some vital part of the economy. But I felt in the story of Brian, the same story that many others that do not fit to the mold of the society feel: being labelled as a misfit, as an outcast, as an indesirable of the society.
Interestingly, Brian and me share roughly the same age (+/- 12 months), come from the same generation (Gen Xers) and have been in our troubled teenage years in the same time. We both are not actual to the punk movement, if we consider the movement “golden age” was in the end 70s-beginning 80s. Yet, the punk movement was alive and kicking proud in the 90s. Some classmate embraced punk as a way to rebel against the system, embracing some anarchist ideas. “Fuck the system!” was the motto. I was like Teflon to embracing punk: it did not stick long on me. I rather was seeking the melodic riffs of the other major genre that grew alongside the punk movement: the New Wave of British Heavy Metal. I was driven by the escaping and incensing tunes of Iron Maiden, swinged by the lyrics of Bruce Dickinson and the guitar melodics. Sure, I was an outcast, I was a nerd and I was the dude that sit quietly in a group of friends. But what I experienced was nothing to what Brian and many teenagers in the US experienced.
As an European, the only exposure to US teenage years was through the TV: you had the posh and falsely glamour pictures from “Beverly Hills 90210” or “Melrose Place”, the funny “Saved By The Bell” (although sometimes opened discussion to serious matters) or what appeared more realistic as “21 Jump Street” (by discussing some real issues). But the one that was really in phase with me was MTV “Daria”. She was also an outcast in her sense, nixing being part of the cheerleader team or being the girlfriend of the football star. She was also a punk at heart along with her friend Jane, without having a crush on Trent (Jane’s brother) that was playing into a rock band during the weekends. It also showed me that the meaning of belonging to a tribe in the US was really much more amplified in the US than it was in Europe.
Where I had no pretension for a music career, Brian saw himself part of the local punk scene dreaming of becoming a leader for a punk band that could make a living of his art. The events that lead to Brian’s death are unknown to me and mostly garnered from reading on different sources.
It seems all started on the IHOP facing the former Western Plaza mall (what seems to be the current strip mall located on I-40@Western corner). On Saturday December 6th, an altercation occurred between Dustin Camp (a honor student and star football player at Tascosa High School) and John King, a member of the local punk scene. For those who are not familiar, Tascosa High School is usually considered one of the most preppy public HS in Yellow City, surrounded by the posh Tascosa neighborhood (since the Colonies neighborhood claim the title of “posh neighborhood). There are contested claims that Camp tried to run on King and his group with his Cadillac, some claiming King hit Camps windshield with a baton. On Friday 12th, Camp and King (alongside their group of friends) set a showdown in front of the same IHOP at 11:00pm. During the fight, Camp retreated in his car and ran over Deneke in an apparent hit-and-run.
The trial was set on Camp with a first-degree murder. The defense attorney, Warren Clark, apparently try to divert the attention of the jury by ostracizing and trying to put the blame on the punk community. Considering the Yellow City community, putting blame on the misfits is an easy target by portraying them with some infamous cliches: “They are lawless, they worship Satan, they are punks.” These are the same kind of stuff we metalheads have to go through: our music is noise, garbage. We are Satan-worshipper, we have tomb-destroyer. We are evil incarnate.
The trial concluded with Camp found guilty as involuntary manslaughter, 10 years probation and $10’000 fine. This is a very mild sentence for someone that voluntarily (according to witnesses) run over Brian and left the crime scene. This case has possibly some signs of “affluenza” in which the social position of the person prosecuted is used to downplay the severity of the crime (“He is a good boy! He is in the Honors list! He is the football star player!”), something we have been already seen. Nevertheless, he was arrested in 2001 for underage drinking, followed by charges on false statement to police and ultimately sentenced in September 2001 to 8 years in prison for violating his probation.

More recently, a movie documentary named “Bomb City” retracing the story of Brian Deneke has received some remarkable standing ovations and awards at various film festivals. I would strongly recommend to watch it and I hope to attend the local airing.

Although the punk and metal scenes rarely mingle (although some can argue that thrash, death metal are intertwining of punk and metal), the small scene in Yellow City make us closer. We don’t have much gigs in town, so when we have some local bands performing in a bar, it is more than welcome. I try to think that what if Brian was still amongst us, maybe I would have been sitting in a bar watching him perform and enjoying his gig.

However, I will never have that chance. I really feel sorry for Brian’s parents about what happened to Brian. I wished I could give them “my sincere condolences” even 20 years after the facts. Rest in Peace Brian 😦


[Metal/Gothic] Evanescence – Synthesis (85%)

ortexAfter several years of hiatus, Amy Lee and Evanescence broke their silence by releasing “Synthesis”, an album providing a re-orchestration of their previous songs. Amy dropped the guitars and the drums to let place to other instruments. Amy is already gifted by a beautiful voice and a talent to play piano. When Evanescence mixed her voice with her piano melodics, this is where my auditory and limbic system explode into a serendipity.
Evanescence played a sort of gateway for me to explore the symphonic metal genre (this is how I got introduced to Nightwish and Within Temptation) but never went fully symphonic. How does the album stands without metal riffs and drums?
It stands good, some songs are impressive by their intimacy and their simpleness, some are kind of a disappointment. Let’s go through together the 16-tracks spanning a bit more than 63 minutes.
We start with “Overture”, an instrumental opening track that introduce us to the piano and violin tones that are the trademark of the album. The first track is the cover of “Never Go Back” from their third album “Evanescence”. Listening to the piano opening sequence is just a thrill on the skin, giving me some goosebumps. This is an example of a successful cover by its ability to remove the heaviness of the original and still sounds so wonderful to the ears. The third track, “Hi-Lo”, was one track that was initially planned to be in “Evanescence” but was not retained. As is it is, it is such a beautiful and intimate song that makes you wonder how it would have sounded in its metal version.
In the opposite, “My Heart is Broken” (the 4th track) sounds much better in its original cover because it already provided such a wonderful blend of the metal, piano and Amy’s voice. The 5th and 6th tracks were sounding as good as the original cover are “Lacrymosa” (The Open Door), “The End of The Dream” (Evanescence).
“Unraveling”, the 7th track posing as an instrumental and melancholic piano solo interlude is sounding so beautiful by its own.
“Imaginary”, the 8th track, is one of the biggest disappointment. The original one, already present in their EP “Origin” was simply perfect as it was, a perfect blend of Amy musical and vocal performance with the heaviness. It was one of my favorite of “Fallen”. This cover just axed it and fail to give justice. What the heck Amy on that one?
“Secret Door” is as good as the original one. Both were instrumental in their conception, very light and sober so they are very comparable. Some of the finest compositions of the band and kind of make you wish they pursued into the direction of Within Temptation or Nightwish. “Lithium”, another of my favorite from “Fallen”, also received the good treatment even amplifying the beauty of the original version.
“Lost in Paradise”, the 12th track, is another failed attempt and liked the original more than the cover in this one. “Your Star”, contrasts and shows how a cover can give back some justice to a track often went unnoticed in the original album (The Open Door).
Track 14, “My Immortal” is the litmus test. I have listened to two versions of the track back in the days: the radio edit version that was heavy and one bootleg downloaded from P2P (Kazaa or eDonkey, I don’t remember) that had the instrumental segment purely on the piano. The cover one revives the bootleg ones, embellishing it and making it even better. Damn, I wished this track and “Bring Me to Life” were not appended to the cinematic turd called “Daredevil”.
“The In-Between” is a piano solo new song written for the album. Oh my! Such a delight of listening Amy playing the piano on this one and emphasize the grave notes giving this melancholic feel to the song. Nobody plays the piano in the metal scene than Amy.
“Imperfection”, the last track is the last “meh” on that album. Not a big fan of it, sounds like a mishmash of styles that makes in my opinion an undigestible thing to listen.Be a judge by yourself you can listen to it below.

Now I am really mad and disappointed i missed on the latest Evanescence tour (due to scheduling conflict) because after 15 years and the loss of Ben after “Fallen”, Evanescence still stand strong of its feet and really should explore some facets of the symphonic metal. A recent meet and greet between Amy and Simone Simons (Epica) could open up some collaboration, especially with some input from Mark.




[Metal/Gothic] Beyond Forgiveness – The Great Wall (80%)

US metal bands playing Gothic Metal or Symphonic Metal are fairly rare birds, in contrast to Europe in which I found the market on the verge to precipitate. Beyond Forgiveness (Colorado Springs, CO) is one of these band that attracted me attention with their EP “The Ferryman’s Shore” and released a couple of weeks ago their first album “The Great Wall”.
How does it fare for a first album? It fares very well, navigating into the current of gothic, symphonic and folk metal keeping upmost of the musical composition “hand-crafted” (in others not over-relying on the keyboards and the studio processing). The result is very pleasant, maybe lacking some ambitious songs that hook you on, but a very nice escaping album that result me in calling the band some metal “troubadours” telling tales, fables and fiends straight out of the middle ages.
This is an album spanning over 10 tracks spanning over 58 minutes. The good point is all the stuff inside are all original materials, no rearrangement of existing materials from their previous EP and singles.
We get into it by the “End of Times”, their first track. It is setting the tones: some good classic metal tones, from the early days of gothic and symphonic metal. Personally, I like that especially considering that a lot of new comers playing the “symphonic” card abuse and overuse the keyboards and post-processing. We quickly transition into the second track and third tracks “The Great Wall” and “Sanctuary”. Good stuff so far. “Imprisoned” fare into more the symphonic metal than the previous track.
“Interlude”, an instrumental melodic ballad track gives the rest of the wandering bard, very nice interlude allowing to appreciate the guitar plays from Richard and Greg. This interlude track also announce a transition in the album, towards a more symphonic type of tone. Whereas “Moment of Truth” sounds more like the first half of the album, “Never Before” has this kind of old-style Nightwish style into it that is not bad. “Dream Before I sleep” is what I call an acoustic track with the voice of Talia accompanied mainly by a piano solo. Good. “I will fight Till The End” brings back the heaviness, just for this track as the last track “Every Breath” brings it more a folk feeling to the music.
Overall the album is quite good but I failed to find something to hook me on. Usually I have one or two “must-listen” song in an album but not this time. The album is very homogenous, maybe a bit too much. Something is still missing to make it a great, I don’t know something bold.
Nevertheless, it is a good starter, give a try and if you like your metal seasoned into some old school gothic and symphonic, give these guys a try, their album is available on Bandcamp and iTunes.